Uncut Magazine 307 (December 2022) Bob Dylan

Uncut Magazine 307 (December 2022) Bob Dylan

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Uncut Magazine 307 (December 2022) Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan, Robyn Hitchcock, Flaming Lips, Davy Graham, L7, Weyes Blood, Alan Parsons, Misty In Roots, Alabaster DePlume, Peter Frampton and Willy DeVille all feature in the new Uncut, dated December 2022 and in UK shops from October 13 or available to buy online now. This issue comes with an exclusive free 15-track CD of the month’s best new music.

BOB DYLAN: As Bob Dylan live fever reaches its peak, Uncut travels to Stockholm to experience the Rough And Rowdy Ways Tour up close. First, though, Uncut’s writers – and some close associates – relive their own legendary encounters with Bob from his past seven decades of challenging, constantly evolving live music. Take your seat alongside us at Sheffield City Hall in 1965, Madison Square Garden in 1974, the Spokane Opera House in 1980 and beyond, down 50 transformative years, in our definitive, eye-witness report on Dylan in concert.

OUR FREE CD! CONTAINS MULTITUDES: 15 tracks of the month’s best new music

Inside the issue, you’ll find:

THE FLAMING LIPS: Axl Rose! Cat Stevens! Songs to sing at funerals! As a 20th-anniversary boxset expands the technicolour universe of The Flaming Lips’ Yoshimi Battles The Pink Robots, Wayne Coyne reveals the real story of how his band of freaks inherited the Earth. “We just embraced it all, and did it our way,” learns Sam Richards.

WEYES BLOOD: With Titanic Rising – Uncut’s Album Of The Year in 2019 – Weyes Blood’s Natalie Mering conjured up a beguiling mix of bold cinematic dreams and ecological fears. For her follow-up, And In The Darkness, Hearts Aglow, she has further refined her singular vision. She tells Jaan Uhelszki about Buddhist anthems, Greek myths and – of course! – the end of the world: “My idea of impending doom is a lot closer than people think.”

DAVY GRAHAM: He was a revolutionary spirit at the vanguard of the ’60s folk movement, until drug addiction and mental health issues waylaid his mercurial talent. Here friends and collaborators and – among them Shirley Collins, Martin Carthy and Ray Davies – celebrate the nimble-fingered magic of Davy Graham. “He burned very brightly for a short time, and no-one forgot that,” hears Rob Hughes.

MISTY IN ROOTS: Emerging from their west London squat during the racially charged late ’70s, they battled inequality and injustice through their powerful “progressive protest music”. They went on to record one of the greatest live albums of all time, enjoy the patronage of John Peel and Pete Townshend, and become the first British reggae group to play in Russia – before relocating to a farm in Zimbabwe. All while they endured trauma and tragedy whose scars can still be felt to this day. This, then, is the remarkable story of Misty In Roots. “The music is our legacy,” they tell Dave Simpson. “It will outlast all of us.”

ROBYN HITCHCOCK: As the singular psych-folk troubadour releases his 22nd album with help from famous friends, he answers your pressing enquiries.

L7: The making of “Pretend We’re Dead”.

ALAN PARSONS: The ultimate backroom boy on his massively successful “prog pop” career.

THE BEATLES: Their pivot-point LP gets a fresh spin.

In our expansive reviews section, we take a look at new records from King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard, Richard Dawson, Arctic Monkeys, Big Joanie and more, and archival releases from PJ Harvey, Iris Dement, Bright Eyes, and others. We catch the End Of The Road live; among the films, DVDs and TV programmes reviewed are The Banshees Of Inisherin, Triangle Of Sadness, Vesper, Neptune Frost and A Bunch Of Amateurs; while in books there’s Tom Doyle and Brian Johnson.

Our front section, meanwhile, features Pharoah Sanders, Peter Frampton, Willy DeVille, International Anthem & Skullcrusher, while, at the end of the magazine, Alabaster DePlume shares his life in music.

Check out the Uncut website.